samedi 13 mars 2010
(I'm rather tapped out for new material now, so I am resurrecting my never-completed Bretagne series about our trip to Bretagne in August)

On our third day in Bretagne, Alain's mother, grandmother, Alain, and I went to visit his aunt, uncle, and cousin in a town called Saint-Pol-de-Léon (Kastell Paol in Breton).

His aunt and uncle came to our wedding, but not his cousin, so this was the first time I had met her. His uncle had one week left before retiring (at the ripe old age of 50) from the SNCF. They had bought an old maison du village a few years ago, renovating it and planning to move there from Chartres when he retired. It was a really cute old stone house with three levels.

We spent the afternoon with them, drinking tea and coffee and eating pastries.

Saint Pol: 7,500 inhabitants, capital of artichokes and cabbages.

That is certainly true. Passing some fields of artichokes, I figured that it must be the crop for the entire world. Surely there cannot be that many people in the world who like artichokes? What a funny looking plant.

Apparently the town is named after an evangelist Pol-Aurélien who established a large monastery in the 6th century.

2 commentaires:

talesfromagarden a dit…

Hi Megan,
I remember visiting St.Pol De Leon a few years back when we were returning to the ferry at Roscoff to sail back to Ireland after another great holiday in France,I love the country!
It is a lovely town with pretty shops,there was a circus there that day too.Like Roscoff it can be bypassed by tourists hurrying off further south after coming off the ferry!

Jake the ColoIowaConnectifrancilite a dit…

BRETAGNE!!! If I were born French, I would be a Breton! I am even dating one right now!! They are the coolest people!!! :-) I hope you keep writing about your time there. Nantes only 1/2 counts as Bretagne. It totally depends on who you are talking with. Lannion, on the other hand, is 100% Breton.

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